I admit it: I'm a total geek. I love electronics, programming, 3D art, vintage Apple hardware, and whisky. I'm always juggling half a dozen projects. I also enjoy documenting it all: my successes, my failures, my experiences... and everything geeky along the way.


 
 
 
 
 

Bare Bones Arduino V3, Part I | Kevin Rye.net - Main

Kevin Rye

Geek Extraordinaire. Yeh, I said it.

Bare Bones Arduino V3, Part I

I really liked the way that my Bare Bones Arduino boards came out. Both versions. They’ve really come in handy. They’re great for throwing quick projects together.

BBA1and2_0064

I never put holes on them so that they could be mounted. The main reason behind not placing mounting holes on the PCBs was two-fold. First, I wanted to make the boards as small as possible to keeps cost down. Secondly, I never intended on mounting these boards. They were more so for things that would just get tossed in a project box and maybe secured with a drop or two of hot glue; if they even needed to be secured at all. (Something like what I did with the RGB Night Light and the Tesseract.)

For the RGB Night Light, the PCB didn’t even need to be mounted. I just shoved it in the enclosure along with all the other guts.

RGB_NL_BBA2_001

For the Tesseract, the PCB was secured to the bottom of the LED boards with few drops of hot glue.

tesseract_BBA2_0027

However, I’d like to make a new version of the Bare Bones Arduino PCB with holes so that they can be mounted between some sheets of acrylic. I’d also like to swap out all the through-hole components for SMD versions.

I took the Bare Bones V2 schematic, and got to work.

Screen Shot 2014-01-02 at 2.28.32 PM

I then created a new outline for the PCB that included mounting holes. I basically just resized one of Dangerous Prototypes Sick of Beige footprints. I also want to be able to stack some shields on top. I could have made it a little thinner, but I left a little bit of space so that the shields will have a little more real estate between the headers.

Screen Shot 2014-01-02 at 2.28.42 PM

I then printed it out just for kicks. Even though it’s a tiny bit larger than the BBA1 and BBA2, it’s still pretty small.

BBA3footprint_0001

Here’s the OSH Park render:

BBA3 OSHPARK render front

BBA3 OSHPARK render back

I even chalked up a 3D model in order to get a better feel for how it will look with shields attached. (When I design one, that is.)

Screen Shot 2014-01-03 at 3.28.09 PM

After I had submitted my design, I got to work on the enclosure. Using the dimensions from Eagle, I chalked up a design in SketchUp.

Screen Shot 2014-01-02 at 8.48.41 PM

Again, I printed it out just to see what it looked like. I taped the BBA3 PCB printout to the back of it and held it up to my monitor just to make sure that my spacing was good. I left a 1/6th” overhang on all sides.

BBA3acrylicfootprint_0010

With that looking good, it was then just a matter of exporting the SketchUp file as an SVG file. I then took it into Inkscape and filled the template for Ponoko. I fit 15 on a 7” x 7” sheet. That’s enough for 7 assemblies, with one left over as a spare.

Screen Shot 2014-01-02 at 9.43.42 PM

The PCBs cost $11.10 for 3 and the acrylic cost $7.30 in materials and cutting. I paid an extra $5.48 to rush it. In the past it’s taken up to 2 weeks to turn them around. With the extra fee, they promise to have it done in a day.

With the rest of the components, a complete assembly should only cost me about $5 bucks. Not too shabby.

Hopefully I get the PCBs and the acrylic around the same time. I hate when a project gets held up waiting for parts.

I already have an idea for a shield. I have a ton of 7-segment displays that I’ve sourced over the years. It’s time to use some of them up.

7segsbucket_0011

See this project from start to finish:
Bare Bones Arduino V3, Part I
Bare Bones Arduino V3, Part II